The Beyhive is buzzing over new “Lemonade” teasers

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Juicing lemons into lemonade (flickr/ Rob Bertholf)

I may not be a hardcore fan of Beyonce but I do love her music, her passion, and her outlook on life. She’s a wonderful voice for feminism and women in general, and she’s bringing us (girls) out of our cage.

CNN.com wrote an article about everything she’s been releasing about “Lemonade,” what it is is still a question but no matter what it’s going to be fabulous.  A favorable twitter account (@TheBeyhiveTeam) provokes the thoughts of an album movie (she made a music video for every song on her previous self-titled album), a new “Formation” video edit as well as a new album.

If this album is anything like “Formation” I will scream. Hopefully it will be released before the drive back home after finals.

What do you think “Lemonade” is? Are you hyped for Queen Bey’s new album?

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Meal prepping: The new health fad

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Meal Prepping (flickr/ Taz + Belly)

The average college student eats out of convenience.

Running late in the morning? Most skip out on breakfast entirely thus making them hungrier later in the day. Lunch is another story. With the time limit of an hour or less, you pick whatever will feed you the quickest or hold out until dinner.

Dinner is the time when you can relax, eat whatever you want and catch up on all of the calories you missed out on during the day.

Preparing meals in bulk won’t only keep you happy and fed for all meals of the day, it will also cut down the average food expenses during the week. It is a good way to stay educated about what goes into your body.

College meal prepper, Tianna Hairston, spends on average $50 for a week of lunches and dinners.

“You need to spend a little more in the beginning when trying to meal prep,” Hairston said. “You need to buy the containers.”

Hairston, a sports media sophomore at Oklahoma State University, suggests buying enough containers to hold all of your meals for the week. For example, if you’re making lunch and dinner for an entire week, you need 14 containers.

Meal prepping is the cheapest way to get all of the nutrients a body needs to survive, Hairston said.

The cost of meal prepping isn’t nearly as much as a week of meals from the OSU Student Union or the Kerr-Drummond Mezzanine. Meals cost up to $10. Multiply that by two for lunch and dinner and there’s a third of what a meal prepper spends for an entire week in one day, Hairston said.

Meal prepping is a great kick-starter for weight loss. It allows you to keep track of what you put into your body. Calories, carbs, sodium, cholesterol; things that could be life or death can easily be tracked, Hairston said.

“We bought the slogan ‘America’s Healthiest Campus’ but we’re not,” Hairston said. “Our options are really limited if [we] want to have a full balanced meal.”

Stacey Allen, senior mechanical engineering major, said when you’re in the heat of the moment and you’re hungry, you just throw out the idea of making a healthy meal and opt for McDonald’s.

On the opposite side, when you eat the same thing every day you’ll start getting the mindset of overindulging yourself with the same meal and you’ll start eating less, Allen said.

“It’s like when you eat pizza every day,” Allen said. “You’re going to get tired of the same thing so you’ll only eat one piece when it’s offered; where as if you don’t get it every day then you’ll over-indulge and spoil yourself.”

Buying a certain meat, such as chicken, in bulk, you can use that to make a variety of meals throughout the week that are healthy as well as a low cost, Allen said.

A fun meal prep recipe is a grilled chicken and veggie bowl by picky-palate.com

32 ounces of cubed chicken (pre-marinated from the night before)

There is a pack of 10 frozen chicken breasts at 20 Something

16oz cooked quinoa

16oz brown rice (sold at 20 Something)

4 cups/32oz roasted asparagus, chopped

4 cups/ 32oz roasted cauliflower florets

Feel free to add any other vegetable you want or substitute any of the above with your favorite vegetables.

Roasting the vegetables require placing them onto a baking sheet, drizzling olive oil on them and seasoning them with salt and pepper. Place the baking sheet into the oven at 375 degrees until the vegetables are tender. Time varies for each vegetable.

Remember when buying containers, they must be microwave safe. Traditional dorms have cookware available for check out.

http://picky-palate.com/2013/09/11/grilled-chicken-veggie-bowls-meal-prep/

Source: Meal prepping: The new health fad

Mental illnesses affect more people than we think

 

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Olympic Swimming (Flickr/Atos)

I never considered an athlete to have a mental illness or an eating disorder. I just figured that they were perfect and were trained to not be affected by silly things like disorders and mental illnesses because it would make them weaker or something. I understand that pressure can make even the most sane person do something crazy but I just didn’t think athletes were in that boat.

A swimmer for the University of Michigan went through a mental illness as well as an eating disorder (kind of the same thing, kind of not). Eating disorders could be categorized as a mental illness but a mental illness is more than that, think of chronic anxiety that eats at you every second of the day or schizophrenia.

She overcame her illness with the help of counselors hired by the university and therapy sessions. That isn’t always the best option for people who suffer from these illnesses. Money is a terrible thing; it keeps people from getting necessary things like therapy or medical treatment.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Someone is available to talk 24/7 and they also offer a live chat online.

Remember that whatever you’re going through won’t last forever and you’re not alone.